First Year Writing (FYW)


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Course Selection


Contacts

Christa DiMarco
Director of Writing
cdimarco@uarts.edu

Terra Building Room 829 | 215.717.6512

Melanie Boston
ESL Coordinator
mboston@uarts.edu

1500 Pine Street Room 102 | 215.717.6822

Overview

The Writing Program is designed to meet the individual needs of art students. A student’s path through the writing program will be tailored to suit specific reading and writing aims, providing opportunities to strengthen academic and artistic processes.

FYW Requirements

The University's writing program requires all students successfully complete LACR 100 or 101 and LACR 102 or 103. Some students may be required to complete additional developmental coursework. Assigned writing sequences are tailored to each student by evaluating SAT or ACT scores as well as English placement test scores.

After a student is placed into a writing class for their first semester, they typically will follow one of the following sequences to complete the FYW requirement.


1st Semester 2nd Semester 3rd Semester
Standard LACR 101 LACR 102
Increased Contact LACR 100 LACR 103
Remedial LACR 009 LACR 100 LACR 103
ESL LACR 008 LACR 100 LACR 103

FYW Course Offerings

LACR 008 English as a Second Language 3 Credits

LACR 008 prepares students for whom English is a second language to produce the kinds of writing and presentations expected of them on the college level, and to improve their reading and critical thinking skills. This course focuses on prose techniques. Students will learn to respond in writing and speaking to readings and to the work of other students. The workshop format engages students in collaborative learning activities. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam, the Michigan Placement Test, and TOEFL scores. Students will receive a grade, but this course does not count toward graduation. Successful completion of this course will permit the students to enter LACR 009, LACR 100, or LACR 101, depending on the teacher’s recommendation, in the following semester.

LACR 009 Fundamentals of Composition I 3 Credits

LACR 009 develops students’ critical reading and writing skills so that they may employ the writing processes expected at the college level. The emphasis is on reading comprehension and writing processes (analyzing, applying, and evaluating), as well as on the technical aspects of writing, specifically essay structure, paragraph construction, grammar, punctuation and spelling. As this course is six hours per week, one-to-one time with the instructor is built into the class, so students can work on individual reading and writing issues. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Develop critical reading and writing skills: describing, summarizing, evaluating, and interpreting. 2. Compose a thesis and support it in the body of the essay in well-structured paragraphs. 3. Analyze sources (locate the author’s thesis and evidence). 4. Apply source material through quotation, paraphrase, and summary. 5. Understand how to avoid intentional or unintentional plagiarism. 6. Access source material in the stacks of the library. 7. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling) to write clear sentences. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam and SAT/ACT scores. This course does not count toward graduation. Successful completion will permit students to enter LACR 100 or LACR 101, depending on the teacher’s recommendation, in the following semester.

LACR 100 Fundamentals of Composition II 3 Credits

In LACR 100 the emphasis is on the reading and writing processes that lead to argumentation, as well as on the technical aspects of writing, specifically essay structure, paragraph construction, grammar, punctuation and spelling. Students practice critical reading and writing skills in order to develop academic essays: describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying, and synthesizing. They are introduced to the library’s holdings and taught to access and assess source material. As this course is six hours per week, one-to-one time with the instructor is built into the class, so students can work on individual reading and writing issues. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Demonstrate the critical reading and writing skills needed to construct academic essays – describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying, and synthesizing. 2. Compose a question-based research paper (about four pages in length) and support a thesis in the body of the essay in properly structured paragraphs. Apply source material avoiding intentional or unintentional plagiarism through direct quotation and paraphrase, and cite in MLA format (in-text citations and bibliography) Synthesize source material to support a deductive argument 3. Assess scholarly sources (locate the author’s thesis, evaluate evidence, and weigh credibility). 4. Access source material through the library holdings: reference section, on-line databases, stacks, and in-library periodicals. 5. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling) to write clear sentences. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam and SAT/ACT scores. Successful completion of LACR 008 or LACR 009 may be required as a result of the English Placement Exam. This course substitutes for LACR 101 and successful completion of this course will permit students to enter LACR 102 or LACR 103, depending on the teacher’s recommendation, in the following semester.

LACR 101 First Year Writing I 3 Credits

LACR 101 is the first part of a year-long writing, reading and research course that teaches the fundamental aspects of the responsible student-scholar. The emphasis is on the reading and writing processes that lead to argumentation, as well as on the technical aspects of writing, specifically essay structure, paragraph construction, grammar, punctuation and spelling. Students practice critical reading and writing skills to develop academic essays: describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying and synthesizing. They are introduced to the library’s holdings and taught to access and assess source material. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Demonstrate the critical reading and writing skills needed to construct academic essays describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying, and synthesizing. 2. Compose a question-based research paper (about four pages in length) and support a thesis in the body of the essay in properly structured paragraphs. *Apply source material avoiding intentional or intentional plagiarism through direct quotation and paraphrase and cite in MLA format (in-text citations and bibliography). *Synthesize source material to support a deductive argument. 3. Assess scholarly sources (locate the authors thesis, evaluate evidence, and weigh credibility). 4. Access source material through the library holdings: reference section, on-line databases, stacks, and in-library periodicals. 5. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling) to write clear sentences. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam and SAT/ACT scores. Successful completion of LACR 008 or LACR 009 may be required as a result of the English Placement Exam.

LACR 102 First Year Writing II 3 Credits

A continuation of LACR 101, LACR 102 is the second part of a year-long course that builds on and develops the writing and reading processes that lead to argumentation. During this term an inquiry-based research paper is the focus, as well as grammatical and structural elements of writing college-level essays. The independent research project allows students to utilize the critical reading and writing skills introduced in 101-describing summarizing, analyzing. applying, and synthesizing-to develop a scholarly argument. To illustrate the importance of context in the process of research, a curriculum that is focused around a chosen historical period is examined. Students continue to access and assess the source material available from the library. By the end of this course successful students will: 1. Employ and further develop the critical reading and writing skills introduced in 101-describing, summarizing, analyzing, and synthesizing-to compose a major research essay (about seven pages in length) and build an argument based on previous scholarship, elaborating upon an authors argument orally and in writing. *Conduct independent research through book, periodicals, reference works, on-line databases, interviews, etc. *Synthesize primary and secondary source material to develop a scholarly argument. *Apply source material avoiding intentional or unintentional plagiarism through direct quotation and paraphrase and cite in MLA format (in-text citations and bibliography).*Create an annotated bibliography with five to seven sources that illustrates the ability to access and assess various types of source material. 2. Assess primary and secondary sources (locate authors thesis evaluate evidence, weigh credibility). 3. Access source material through the library holdings: reference section, on-line databases, stacks, and in-library periodicals. 4. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling)to write clear sentences.

LACR 103 Fundamentals of Composition III 3 Credits

A continuation of LACR 100, LACR 103 is the second part of a year-long course that builds on and develops the writing and reading processes that lead to argumentation. During this term an inquiry-based research paper is the focus, as well as the grammatical and structural elements of writing college-level essays. The independent research project allows students to utilize the critical reading and writing skills introduced in 100 or 101 – describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying and synthesizing – to develop a scholarly argument. To illustrate the importance of context in the process of research, a curriculum that is focused around a chosen period is examined. Students continue to access and assess the source material available from the library. As this course is six hours per week, one-to-one time with the instructor is built into the class, so students can work on individual reading and writing issues.